First Chairman of the Medical Advisory Board

La version française suit.

The Medical Advisory Board was created in 1958, currently known as the Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee. It provides advice and makes recommendations to the Board of Directors on research policy, granting programs, and funding. The Committee is comprised of dedicated volunteers from across Canada who have expertise in neuromuscular disease; together, they represent various perspectives from the health professional and patient communities.

Here is the introduction of the Medical Advisory Board and its first Chairman from page five of the April 1958 issue of the Muscular Dystrophy Reporter.

__________________

D’abord créé sous le nom de Conseil consultatif médical en 1958, le Conseil consultatif médical et scientifique remet au conseil d’administration de Dystrophie musculaire Canada des avis, conseils et recommandations sur sa politique de recherche, ses programmes de subventions et son financement. Issus de toutes les régions du pays, chacun des membres de ce comité possède une expertise reconnue dans le domaine des maladies neuromusculaires. Ensemble, ils représentent les opinions et points de vue diversifiés du milieu des professionnels de la santé et de celui des patients.

Parue dans le Muscular Dystrophy Reporter d’avril 1958, la coupure de presse qui suit présente aux lecteurs le premier président du Conseil consultatif médical de l’époque, le Dr A.L. Chute (en anglais seulement).

Founding of Medical Advisory Board

Advertisements

Dr. Ronald Worton

Dr Worton2La version française suit.

For 60 years Muscular Dystrophy Canada has been dedicated to finding a cure and funding research for neuromuscular disorders.  Throughout our history and with the support of our donors and healthcare partners we have funded leading Canadian researchers and international research projects.  This has led to advancements in treatments and has helped Canadians affected with neuromuscular disorders live longer, more enriched lives.

One of the biggest breakthroughs came in 1987.  Dr. Ronald Worton, renowned medical researcher and founding CEO of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, and his team at The Hospital for Sick Children located the casual gene for Duchenne and Dr Worton3Becker muscular dystrophies. This discovery has led to further research and clinical trials to find treatments and cures, and better diagnosis practices. It was also groundbreaking to find that both Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by a mutation on the same gene, though the mutations are different.

In April 2014, Dr. Worton will be inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

Click here to read more about Dr. Worton.

_______________________________

Dr Worton2Depuis 60 ans, Dystrophie musculaire Canada se consacre à trouver un moyen de guérir les maladies neuromusculaires et finance la recherche en ce sens. Au cours de notre histoire, et avec le soutien de nos donateurs et partenaires du domaine de la santé, nous avons soutenu financièrement des chercheurs canadiens de premier ordre ainsi que de grand projets internationaux qui ont permis de réaliser de grands progrès dans le traitement de ces maladies et d’aider les personnes qui en sont atteintes à vivre mieux et plus longtemps.

L’une des percées les plus importantes s’est produite en 1987, lorsque le Dr Ronal Worton, chercheur médical renommé et premier chef de la Dr Worton3direction du Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, et son équipe du Hospital for Sick Children ont localisé le gène à l’origine des dystrophies musculaires de Duchenne et de Becker. Cette découverte a mené à d’autres recherches et à des essais cliniques en vue de mettre au point de nouveaux traitements thérapeutiques et curatifs et de meilleures pratiques diagnostiques. Le fait de découvrir que ces deux formes de dystrophie musculaire étaient causées par des mutations différentes dans un seul et même gène allait aussi donner un élan important à la recherche en ce domaine.

En avril 2014, le Dr Worton sera intronisé au Temple de la renommée médicale canadienne.

On trouvera plus d’information (en anglais) sur le Dr Worton au : http://ow.ly/uACeg

Partnerships at Work

cliniccropLa version française suit.

Last year, a new educational venture was held with the support of Muscular Dystrophy Canada. In partnership with Holland Bloorview and Sick Kids this creation was a family day for those supporting people living with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA); these included children, young adults and adults, as well as their families and caregivers. Dr. Reshma Amin explains how the Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Family Day came about:

“I work in the Complex Respiratory Care clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children along with Dr Theo Moraes, Cathy Daniels NP, Faiza Syed RRT and Ellie Lathrop SW. Our team follows children dependent on respiratory technology (eg BiPAP and invasive ventilation,) many of whom have neuromuscular disorders such as Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Many of these children are often jointly followed at Holland Bloorview Rehabilitation Hospital for their neuromuscular care by Dr. Laura McAdam, the co-chair of this event, and her team. In clinic one day, while we were discussing transition to an adult healthcare center, an adolescent mentioned that he wanted to go to university and that he would love to be able to talk to another young adult with SMA that was successfully attending university. This got us thinking that we should organize a family educational event to facilitate kids with SMA being able to talk to other kids with SMA about ‘real life’ issues.”

Over 100 individuals (a full house) attended the event – most from the Greater Toronto Area, but participants from Thunder Bay, Ontario and New Brunswick were also present. The goal for the day? “To increase awareness about Spinal Muscular Atrophy in the community and to further educate caregivers, and children affected by SMA,” says Dr. Amin. “More specifically we wanted to increase the knowledge of families and children surrounding the medical, and psychosocial impact of SMA. We wanted to provide a venue in which we could foster supportive relationships between affected families. Lastly, we wanted the children and their families to learn of and appreciate the current scientific research activities that are ongoing for SMA.”

The day consisted of listening to many speakers, and participating in discussions and networking opportunities:

“Our key speakers are internationally renowned for their work with Spinal Muscular Atrophy. Dr. John Bach, a Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation from University Hospital, Newark, New Jersey, who has unparalleled  clinical experience with those affected by this disorder, provided us with a provocative overview of the respiratory management of SMA. Brian Weaver, MS, RRT-NPS, RPFT, a respiratory therapist and Department Head at Kimble Medical Center, Newark, New Jersey, provided a practical review of the respiratory complications and the role of respiratory technology for children with SMA. Dr. Alex Mackenzie, a clinician-scientist from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario provided a high level review of SMA research and what clinical trials for children with SMA are current and planned.  There were many other speakers including Tracy Lacey, chair of Fight SMA Canada, her husband Shawn and their daughter Tori, who has been diagnosed with SMA, provided a practical overview of ‘living with a child with SMA’ from needed home modifications, to school considerations. Dr. Adam Rapoport, the Medical Director of the Pediatric Advanced Care Team at SickKids informed families of the support services their team is able to provide to their children and families. Karen Dunbar, Services Specialist for Ontario and Nunavut from Muscular Dystrophy Canada, provided a pragmatic, and informative overview of the services and supports provided by the organization to children and their families with SMA. Dr. Laura McAdam, reviewed the Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry, established with the aim of helping clinicians and scientists improve clinical care of children with neuromuscular disease. There were also sessions focused on caring for a child with a chronic disease, increasing independence of adolescents with chronic disease as well as a break out session just for teenagers with SMA.”

Angela McGonigal, whose son Owen is affected by SMA, thought that the day had many great aspects including the health information shared, and the opportunity to establish networks and bonds with others in the same situation.

“Brian Weaver is a Respiratory Therapist who worked closely with Dr. Bach.  He is a strong proponent of cough assist machines for SMA patients.  He advised that when SMA kids are sick, they can utilize the cough assist machine every 3 hours during the day,” remembers Angela. “He recommends avoiding oxygen therapy as it masks ventilation issues such as secretions.  He encourages chest therapy and recommends having the torso higher than the head to facilitate drainage.”

Muscular dystrophy Canada’s very own Services Specialist for Ontario and Nunavut, Karen Dunbar’s information was also very helpful. “She provided an overview of the home renovation funding and the equipment program and the event was well attended by families, doctors, therapists, nurses, social workers and others involved in SMA patient care.  It was a great opportunity to learn, reflect and connect,” says Angela.

Dr. Amin also heard high praises from attendees, “One participant told me they felt ‘informed, inspired and connected.’ At the end of the day, we were also asked, ‘When are you going to have this next year?’”

Everyone who attended, from clients, parents, caregivers and medical professionals, all learned new things and made new connections. Dr. Amin had one particular memory stand out: “At the end of the day, we had a panel discussion led by adolescents and young adults with Spinal Muscular Atrophy. The audience was able to ask these individuals questions, and the responses were insightful and inspiring.  One young adult with SMA was asked, ‘What is the one thing you would want to change in life if you were able?’ Her response was to be able to change the way people looked at her in a wheelchair. She hoped for a world with an increasing acceptance of children who were different. Her words resonated with everybody who was in the room. As healthcare providers, this is one goal we need to help work towards achieving for these children.”

“We hope that the attendees came away with an increase in knowledge regarding the respiratory management and complications of a child with SMA,” says Dr. Amin. “We also wanted to increase the awareness of the effect of having a child with SMA has on the family, specifically the social and psychosocial consequences of the condition at life’s many transition points. We also hope that we were able to break down barriers and foster open discussions between health care professionals, caregivers, and children both at the event and in the future. Of paramount importance is our hope that we were able to promote a support network for families with children with SMA. We also wanted to fully inform families about the registry as well as other research in SMA in order that they may participate in research if they wish to do so.”

The full house and outstanding feedback from attendees highlights the importance of partnerships between hospitals, care facilities, research centres and not-for-profit organizations, and why sharing information and resources – not only from a research standpoint, but also in terms of services – is so vital to the care of those with neuromuscular disorders. “The Hospital for Sick Children, Holland Bloorview Rehabilitation Hospital, and Muscular Dystrophy Canada all strive to provide better patient centered care to the children and their families,” Dr. Amin explains. “Strong partnerships are essential across hospitals and NFPs to facilitate transitions from hospital to home as well as to develop and support these families in their communities,” says Dr. Amin.  “For example, the funding support of Muscular Dystrophy Canada towards respiratory technology facilitates the purchase of mechanical insufflator-exsufflators (cough assists) for our patients.  This improves their overall pulmonary health and helps to keep these children in school and out of hospital.”

Of course, that is everyone’s ultimate goal.

________________________

The Spinal Muscular Atrophy Family Education Day was hosted by SickKids Hospital and Holland Bloorview Rehabilitation Hospital. This event was made possible by the generous support of Muscular Dystrophy Canada, the SickKids Foundation, Fight SMA Canada and Lifetronics.

For more information on SMA and other neuromuscular disorders, please click here. To learn more about programs offered by Muscular Dystrophy Canada, please contact a Services Specialist in your region.

To learn more about the Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry, click here.

 

_______________________________________________________________

Partenariats en action

cliniccropL’année dernière, une nouvelle initiative éducationnelle s’est tenue grâce au soutien de Dystrophie musculaire Canada. En collaboration avec deux hôpitaux pour enfants de Toronto, le Holland Bloorview et le SickKids, cette initiative a pris la forme d’une journée familiale pour les enfants, jeunes adultes et adultes atteints d’amyotrophie spinale (AS) ainsi que pour leurs parents et aidants. La Dre Reshma Amin explique comment l’idée de cette journée a vu le jour.

« Je travaille à la clinique de soins respiratoires complexes du Hospital for Sick Children avec le Dr Theo Moraes, Cathy Daniels, infirmière praticienne, Faiza Syed, inhalothérapeute, et Ellie Lathrop, travailleuse sociale. Notre équipe assure le suivi d’enfants qui dépendent des technologies respiratoires telles que les appareils à deux niveaux de pression positive et la ventilation invasive. Plusieurs de ces enfants ont une maladie neuromusculaire comme l’amyotrophie spinale et sont souvent suivis en même temps au Holland Bloorview Rehabilitation Hospital pour leurs soins neuromusculaires par la Dre Laura McAdam, coprésidente de cet événement, et son équipe. Un jour, à la clinique, pendant que nous discutions de la transition vers les soins de santé pour adultes, un adolescent a mentionné qu’il voulait aller à l’université et qu’il aimerait bien pouvoir parler à un autre jeune adulte atteint d’AS déjà à l’université. Ceci nous a fait penser qu’il serait intéressant d’organiser une activité familiale éducationnelle pour faciliter les échanges entre enfants atteints d’AS et leur permettre de parler de questions touchant « la vraie vie ».

L’activité a fait salle comble, avec une centaine de participants, la plupart de la région du Grand Toronto mais aussi de Thunder Bay (ON) et du Nouveau-Brunswick. L’objectif de la journée? « Sensibiliser davantage le milieu à l’amyotrophie spinale et mieux informer les aidants et les enfants atteints d’AS », explique la Dre Amin. « Nous voulions plus particulièrement rehausser les connaissances des familles et des enfants en ce qui concerne les impacts médicaux et psychosociaux de la maladie. Nous voulions aussi offrir un lieu de rencontre permettant de favoriser des relations de soutien entre les familles touchées. Enfin, nous voulions que les enfants et leur famille soit informés des recherches scientifiques en cours sur l’amyotrophie spinale. »

La journée a consisté à écouter de nombreux conférenciers, à participer à des discussions et à réseauter.

« Nos conférenciers sont reconnus internationalement pour leur travail dans le domaine de l’amyotrophie spinale. Le Dr John Bach, professeur de physiatrie et de réadaptation à l’University Hospital de Newark, au New Jersey, qui possède une expérience sans pareille des personnes atteintes d’AS, a fait un survol de la gestion respiratoire de l’AS qui avait de quoi faire réfléchir. Brian Weaver, MS, RRT-NPS, RPFT, inhalothérapeute et chef de département du Kimble Medical Center de Newark au New Jersey, a présenté une revue pratique des complications respiratoires et du rôle des technologies respiratoires pour les enfants atteints d’AS. Le Dr Alex Mackenzie, scientifique et clinicien du Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, a offert une revue de haut niveau de la recherche sur l’amyotrophie spinale et des essais cliniques pour enfants qui en sont atteints, présentement en cours et prévus. Il y avait beaucoup d’autres conférenciers, dont Tracy Lacey, président de Fight SMA Canada, son mari Shawn et leur fille Tori, atteinte d’AS, qui ont donné un aperçu pratique de la vie avec un enfant atteint d’AS, depuis les modifications requises au domicile jusqu’aux questions touchant la scolarisation. Le Dr Adam Rapoport, directeur médical de l’équipe de soins pédiatriques avancés du SickKids Hospital a renseigné les familles sur les services de soutien que l’hôpital offre aux enfants et aux familles. Karen Dunbar, spécialiste des services de Dystrophie musculaire Canada pour l’Ontario et le Nunavut, a offert un survol pragmatique et informatif des services et mesures de soutien que son organisme offre aux enfants et familles touchées par l’AS. La Dr Laura McAdam a parlé pour sa part du Canadian Neuromuscular Disease Registry, un registre de patients établi en vue d’aider les cliniciens et les scientifiques à améliorer les soins cliniques des enfants atteints de maladies neuromusculaires. Il y a aussi eu des sessions sur la façon de s’occuper d’un enfant atteint d’une maladie chronique, d’améliorer l’autonomie des adolescents qui ont une maladie chronique ainsi qu’un atelier réservé aux adolescents ayant l’AS. »

De l’avis d’Angela McGonigal, dont le fils, Owen, a l’amyotrophie spinale, la journée comportait de nombreux aspects intéressants, notamment le partage d’information sur la santé et la possibilité de réseauter avec des gens qui sont dans la même situation.

« Brian Weaver est un inhalothérapeute qui a travaillé étroitement avec le Dr Bach. C’est un ardent défenseur du recours aux appareils d’assistance à la toux pour les patients atteints d’AS. Lorsqu’un enfant AS est malade, il conseille d’utiliser l’appareil d’assistance à la toux aux trois heures pendant la journée, rappelle Angela. Il recommande aussi d’éviter l’oxygénothérapie puisqu’elle masque les problèmes de ventilation tels que les sécrétions. Il encourage la physiothérapie respiratoire et recommande de positionner le torse plus haut que la tête pour faciliter le drainage. »

L’information fournie par Karen Dunbar, la spécialiste des services de Dystrophie musculaire Canada pour l’Ontario et le Nunavut, a aussi été très utile. « Elle a parlé du financement disponible pour l’adaptation du domicile et du programme d’aides techniques. Les familles, médecins, thérapeutes, infirmières, travailleurs sociaux et autres personnes concernées par le suivi des patients AS étaient tous fort bien représentés. Ce fut une excellente occasion de s’informer, de réfléchir et de réseauter », ajoute Mme McGonigal.

La Dre Amin a aussi entendu des commentaires très positifs chez les participants. « L’un d’eux m’a dit qu’il se sentait informé, inspiré et connecté. À la fin de la journée, on nous a aussi demandé quand se tiendrait cette activité l’année prochaine. »

Clients, parents, aidants et professionnels médicaux, tous les participants ont appris quelque chose de neuf et rencontré des gens intéressants. Un événement a plus particulièrement marqué la Dre Amin  « C’était à la fin de la journée, lors d’un débat réunissant un panel d’adolescents et de jeunes adultes atteints d’amyotrophie spinale. Le public pouvait leur poser des questions et leurs réponses étaient éclairées et inspirantes. On a demandé à une jeune adulte atteinte Quelle est la chose que vous voudriez changer dans votre vie si vous le pouviez? Sa réponse : changer la façon dont les gens la regardent dans son fauteuil roulant. Elle rêve d’un monde où les enfants qui sont différents seraient mieux acceptés. Ses mots ont trouvé un écho chez tous ceux qui étaient présents. En tant que professionnel de la santé, voilà un objectif que nous devons tous contribuer à réaliser, pour le bien de ces enfants. »

« Nous espérons que les participants sont repartis avec de meilleures connaissances au sujet des soins et des complications respiratoires chez les enfants atteints d’amyotrophie spinale », ajoute la Dre Amin. « Nous voulions aussi les sensibiliser davantage à l’impact qu’a un enfant AS sur la famille, et plus particulièrement aux conséquences sociales et psychosociales de la maladie au moment des différentes transitions qui surviennent au cours d’une vie. Nous espérons aussi avoir favorisé une discussion plus ouverte entre les professionnels de la santé, les aidants et les enfants, lors de cette rencontre mais aussi pour l’avenir. Surtout, nous espérons avoir encouragé l’établissement et le renforcement d’un réseau de soutien pour les familles des enfants atteints d’AS. Enfin, nous voulions fournir aux familles une information complète sur le registre et sur d’autres recherches sur la maladie afin qu’ils puissent choisir d’y participer ou non en toute connaissance de cause. »

La très forte participation et les commentaires unanimement positifs de cette journée soulignent l’importance de la collaboration entre les hôpitaux, les centres de soins, les centres de recherche et les organismes sans but lucratif et illustre l’importance pour le suivi des personnes qui vivent avec une maladie neuromusculaire de la mise en commun de l’information et des ressources, non seulement pour ce qui est de la recherche mais aussi en termes de services. « Qu’il s’agisse du Hospital for Sick Children, du Holland Bloorview Rehabilitation Hospital ou de Dystrophie musculaire Canada, nous nous efforçons tous de fournir aux enfants et à leur famille de meilleurs soins centrés sur les patients », explique la Dre Amin. « Il est essentiels que des partenariats solides soient établis entre tous les hôpitaux et les OSBL pour faciliter les transitions de l’hôpital à la maison ainsi que pour soutenir ces familles dans leur milieu propre », ajoute la Dre Amin. « Ainsi, le soutien financier de Dystrophie musculaire Canada pour les technologies respiratoires facilite l’acquisition d’appareils d’assistance mécanique à la toux pour nos patients, ce qui améliore leur santé pulmonaire dans son ensemble et contribue à garder ces enfants à l’école et hors de l’hôpital. »

Et bien sûr, c’est là l’objectif ultime pour tous.

________________________

Le Spinal Muscular Atrophy Family Education Day a été organisé conjointement par le SickKids Hospital et le Holland Bloorview Rehabilitation Hospital. Cette journée a été rendue possible par le généreux soutien de Dystrophie musculaire Canada, la SickKids Foundation, Fight SMA Canada et Lifetronics.

Pour plus d’information sur l’amyotrophie spinale et sur les autres maladies neuromusculaires, cliquez ici. Pour en savoir plus sur les programmes qu’offre Dystrophie musculaire Canada, nous vous invitons à contacter notre spécialiste des services de votre région.

Mary Ann Wickham: Foundation of Services

Mary Ann Wickham-1La version française suit.

Mary Ann Wickham was one of the first volunteers for the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada, and her unique contributions to the organization have shaped the Services departments. Her unique approach gave the newly formed MDAC a stronger purpose, and presence. Research was the base of the organization, but providing information, equipment, and care for those affected by neuromuscular disorders rounded out the MDAC. We honour an exceptional volunteer every year in her name with the Mary Ann Wickham Award for Volunteer of the Year.

Below is an excerpt from Connections (MDAC newsletter,) issue from September 1989:

The Lady With The Lift

Thirty-five years ago Mary Ann Wickham got off a bus on the corner of Bay and Wellington Streets in Toronto, looked across the street, and happened to see a sign in a store window – “The Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada.”

“I knew nothing about muscular dystrophy, but I went in an asked the people there if I could do some volunteer work,” said Wickham, who had just moved to Toronto in 1954 and was working full time as a nurse. “The next week I went to my first Toronto Chapter meeting. Dr. David Green was there, and so was Arthur Minden. When they heard of my nursing background, they asked if I would mind visiting some of the people in Toronto who had muscular dystrophy.”

So began, in these chance circumstances, a new chapter in Mary Ann Wickham’s life that would ultimately determine her future career. But these same lucky circumstances would also help to shape the future of the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada as we know it today, turning it into an organization that not only supports medical research, but offers services and information to its clients as well.

For   eleven years – from 1954 to 1965 – Mary Ann Wickham was the Client Services staff for the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada, always on a volunteer basis. But she also became deeply involved in other Association activities, too: helping to organize social events, starting new MDAC Chapters in other Ontario cities, travelling throughout the province to talk to clubs and groups, and ultimately becoming a member of the MDAC Board.

But Wickham’s primary commitment to MDAC was always visiting clients, at least two nights a week and all day Saturday.

“I kept the equipment in my basement,” she recalled. “If anybody needed a wheelchair or a Hoyer lift, I would deliver it. There were about 30 clients in Toronto then – and it quickly became very frustrating, because I was really not able to visit them all on a routine basis. I ended up with a map on the wall of my house with little pins showing where everyone was, so if I had to make a call in a certain district, I would always make two or three other stops in the vicinity to see how everyone was doing.

“Thirty-five years doesn’t really seem that long ago,” Wickham said, “but compared to those days, the information we have today about neuromuscular diseases and the change in attitudes towards disabled people seem absolutely incredible.”

In 1954 there was no public funding of wheelchairs, for example – “MDAC had to buy all of them,” said Wickham. “And we recycled them, too, again and again. No one had training in fitting wheelchairs either. The only choice was between wheelchairs for adults and those for children, with perhaps a pillow on their back or on the seat to try and make things a little more comfortable.

“Almost no one knew anything about genetics back then or had any notion that muscular dystrophy might be inherited,” she recalled. “One family I spent a lot of time with had three sons with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and two daughters with peroneal muscular atrophy. The poor mother just thought it was bad luck that all these sad things had happened to her family.

“There was no knowledge in the general public that there was more than one kind of muscular dystrophy – everyone just called them all ‘creeping paralysis.’ Many people even thought muscular dystrophy was contagious. Sometimes at the information booths we set up at the Canadian National Exhibition or at local fairs, people would step back, saying they didn’t want to take any brochures, because they might get muscular dystrophy. Families sometimes told me, too, that their child was being kept out of school because other parents were afraid their own children might catch muscular dystrophy.”

Attitudes toward disabled people, even on the part of families who loved them and governments who wanted to help them, have gone through a complete metamorphosis in the past 35 years, too, according to Wickham.

“There was no thought of preparing a child with muscular dystrophy to go to work or to live independently,” she remembered. “Parents just wanted to keep their children at home, to make them as comfortable and happy as possible. Most schools and universities didn’t accept disabled students anyway – there was no transportation available, and all the public buildings were inaccessible.”

It was in this general climate that Mary Ann Wickham began her years of volunteer work on behalf of those people with neuromuscular diseases. She brought her ideas and her experiences with her to MDAC Board meetings in Toronto, always arguing one constant point: to support medical research is extremely important, but the services MDAC could offer its clients were equally important.

“I talked about the human side of my work, about the joy of being able to give a wheelchair to a boy who had never been able to go out shopping with his family… and I think that was what finally convinces many of the Board members.”

In 1965, for the first time in its history, MDAC hired a full time Patient Services staff person, a nurse, who worked out of the Toronto office. Today there are 16 Client Service staff in all regions of Canada, providing the equipment, advice, and information Mary Ann Wickham so ably dispensed all those years as a volunteer.

“I feel gratefully today for my past with the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada, that it has been part of my life to feel I was able to contribute something to muscular dystrophy,” said Wickham. “I think the greatest joy I have today is meeting a person who tells me – ‘Years ago you were the first person who contacted me after we had our diagnosis of muscular dystrophy, and I feel very close to you.’”

What was it that Mary Ann Wickham told families 35 years ago when she visited them at night soon after their child was diagnosed?

“Usually I would just sit down and chat with them,” she remembered. “On that first visit, I would tell them as much about the disorder as they were prepared to ask, and no further. Most of all I would say, ‘Please remember, we are here… call if you have any questions. Remember… you are not alone.’”

 __________________________________

Today, Muscular Dystrophy Canada is still committed to providing excellent services to those affect by neuromuscular disorders, their families and communities. Please register to stay connected and to receive services.

_________________________________________________________________________

Mary Ann Wickham, fondatrice des services aux clients

Mary Ann Wickham-1Mary Ann Wickham fut l’une des premières bénévoles de l’Association canadienne de la dystrophie musculaire et sa contribution a façonné l’organisation des services aux clients. Son approche a aussi renforcé l’objectif et la présence de la toute nouvelle organisation. La recherche était la raison d’être de l’ACDM, mais offrir de l’information, des aides techniques et des soins aux personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires venait compléter sa mission. Chaque année, nous remettons le prix Mary-Ann-Wickham à un ou une bénévole d’exception.

Voici un extrait du numéro de septembre 1989 de Connexions, le bulletin d’information de l’ACDM.

La dame au lève-personne

Il y a 35 ans, Mary Ann Wickham descendit de l’autobus à l’angle des rues Bay et Wellington à Toronto. L’enseigne d’une vitrine de l’autre côté de la rue accrocha son regard : « L’Association canadienne de la dystrophie musculaire ».

« Je ne savais rien de la dystrophie musculaire, mais j’ai poussé la porte et j’ai demandé aux gens qui s’y trouvaient s’ils avaient besoin de bénévoles », raconte Mme Wickham, qui venait tout juste de déménager à Toronto en 1954 et travaillait à plein temps comme infirmière. « La semaine suivante, j’assistais à ma première rencontre de la section locale de Toronto. Le Dr David Green était là, ainsi qu’Arthur Minden. Lorsqu’ils ont su que j’étais infirmière, ils m’ont demandé si j’accepterais de visiter certaines personnes de Toronto atteintes de dystrophie musculaire. »

Et c’est dans ces circonstances fortuites qu’a débuté un nouveau chapitre de la vie de Mary Ann Wickham, un chapitre qui allait un jour déterminer l’avenir de sa carrière. Mais ces mêmes circonstances allaient aussi aider à façonner l’avenir de l’Association canadienne de la dystrophie musculaire telle que nous la connaissons aujourd’hui, la transformant en un organisme qui non seulement appuie la recherche médicale mais offre aussi des services et de l’information à ses clients.

Pendant onze ans, de 1954 à 1965, Mary Ann Wickham fut, à elle seule, le service aux clients de l’Association, toujours à titre bénévole. Mais elle était aussi fortement impliquée dans d’autres activités de l’organisme, aidant à organiser des événements sociaux, mettant sur pied de nouvelles sections locales de l’ACDM dans d’autres villes de l’Ontario, parcourant la province pour faire des présentations à divers clubs et groupes et, au bout de quelques années, devenant membre du conseil d’administration de l’ACDM.

Mais son premier engagement envers l’ACDM fut toujours la visite des clients qu’elle effectuait au moins deux soirs par semaine et toute la journée du samedi.

« Les aides techniques étaient entreposées dans mon sous-sol », se rappelle-t-elle. « Si quelqu’un avait besoin d’un fauteuil roulant ou d’un lève-personne Hoyer, je m’occupais de la livraison. À l’époque, il y avait une trentaine de clients à Toronto et, très rapidement, la situation est devenue très frustrante puisque je ne pouvais pas vraiment les visiter tous régulièrement. Chez moi, j’avais une carte fixée au mur, avec des épingles indiquant où les clients étaient situés et, lorsque je devais faire une visite dans un certain secteur, je m’arrangeais toujours pour faire deux ou trois autres arrêts dans les environs pour voir comment tout le monde allait. »

« Trente-cinq ans, ça ne semble pas si loin que ça, dit Mme Wickham, mais comparé à ces années-là, ce que nous savons aujourd’hui sur les maladies neuromusculaire et le changement d’attitude envers les personnes handicapées semblent absolument incroyable. »

Ainsi, en 1954, il n’y avait pas de financement public pour des fauteuils roulant. « L’ACDM devait tous les acheter », de dire Mme Wickham. « Et nous les recyclions aussi, encore et encore. Personne n’était formé non plus pour ajuster ces fauteuils. Le seul choix était un fauteuil pour adulte ou un fauteuil pour enfant, avec peut-être un coussin pour le dos ou le siège pour essayer de le rendre un peu plus confortable. »

« À l’époque, très peu de gens avaient entendu parler de génétique et personne ne se doutait que la dystrophie musculaire puisse être une maladie héréditaire », se rappelle-t-elle. « Dans une famille avec laquelle j’ai passé beaucoup de temps, il y avait trois garçons atteints de dystrophie musculaire de Duchenne et deux filles avec la maladie de Charcot-Marie-Tooth. La pauvre mère croyait que tous ces malheurs qui s’abattaient sur sa famille n’étaient dus qu’à la malchance. »

« Le public ignorait entièrement qu’il existait plus d’une forme de dystrophie musculaire. Tout le monde appelait ces maladies paralysies progressives. Plusieurs pensaient même que la dystrophie musculaire était contagieuse. Parfois, aux stands d’information que nous installions à l’Exposition nationale canadienne ou à des foires locales, les gens reculaient en nous voyant, disant qu’ils ne voulaient pas prendre de dépliants de peur d’attraper la dystrophie musculaire. Certaines familles m’ont aussi confié qu’on empêchait leur enfant de fréquenter l’école parce que les autres parents craignaient que leurs propres enfants attrapent la maladie. »

Selon Mme Wickham, les attitudes envers les personnes handicapées, même celles des familles qui les aimaient et les gouvernements qui voulaient les aider, se sont complètement métamorphosées au cours des 35 dernières années.

« On ne pensait pas à préparer un enfant atteint de dystrophie musculaire à aller travailler ou à vivre de façon autonome », se rappelle-t-elle. « Les parents voulaient seulement garder leurs enfants à la maison et veiller à ce qu’ils soient le plus confortable et le plus heureux possible. De toute façon, la plupart des écoles et des universités n’acceptaient pas d’étudiants handicapés. Il n’y avait pas de transport disponible et aucun édifice public n’était accessible. »

C’est dans ce climat général que Mary Ann Wickham a commencé ses nombreuses années de travail bénévole auprès des personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires. Elle a apporté ses idées et ses expériences à la table du conseil d’administration de l’ACDM à Toronto, défendant toujours la même idée : soutenir la recherche est extrêmement important, mais les services que l’ACDM pouvait être en mesure d’offrir à ses clients étaient tout aussi importants.

« Je parlais du côté humain de mon travail, de la joie de pouvoir donner un fauteuil roulant à un garçon qui n’avait jamais pu sortir avec sa famille… et je crois que c’est ce côté humain qui a finalement convaincu plusieurs des membres du conseil. »

En 1965, pour la première fois de son histoire, l’ACDM engageait sa première employée à plein temps pour ses services aux clients, une infirmière qui travaillait au bureau de Toronto. Aujourd’hui, les services aux clients peuvent compter sur un personnel de 16 personnes réparties dans toutes les régions du Canada pour fournir les aides techniques, les conseils et l’information que Mary Ann Wickham a dispensé avec tant de dévouement pendant toutes ses années à titre bénévole.

« Je suis reconnaissante aujourd’hui de mon passé avec l’Association canadienne de la dystrophie musculaire, reconnaissante que l’ACDM ait fait partie de ma vie et m’ait permis de sentir que je pouvais faire ma part pour la dystrophie musculaire, dit-elle. Je crois que la plus grande joie pour moi aujourd’hui c’est de rencontrer une personne qui me dit : Il y a des années, vous avez été la première personne à me contacter après que nous ayons reçu notre diagnostic de dystrophie musculaire et je me sens très près de vous. »

Que disait donc Mary Ann Wickham il y a 35 ans aux familles qu’elle visitait le soir, peu de temps après que leur enfant ait reçu son diagnostic?

« Généralement, je ne faisais que m’asseoir et parler avec eux, dit-elle. Lors de la première visite, je leur en disais autant sur la maladie qu’ils me demandaient, mais pas plus. Surtout, je leur disais : N’oubliez pas que nous sommes là… appelez-nous si vous avez des questions. Vous n’êtes pas seuls. »

 _____________

Dystrophie musculaire Canada est toujours engagée à fournir d’excellents services aux personnes atteintes de maladies neuromusculaires, à leurs proches et à leurs milieux. Nous vous invitons à vous inscrire pour garder le contact et recevoir des services.

Thames Valley One Day Fun Day

ThamesValley2I am writing a quick post to tell of a wonderful opportunity I had in October 2013; I  shared a fun filled day with the staff, and families of the Thames Valley Children’s Centre (TVCC) in London, Ontario.

“On October 19, 2013, TVCC NM Clinic Team held our first One Day Fun Day at Easter Seals Camp Woodeden. We had ten campers attend,” says Occupational Therapist Cheryl Scholtes. “We played games in the gym, made chocolate chip cookies – YUM! – had a scavenger hunt, dressed up – we looked pretty silly – and finished with a campfire with skits and songs. Moms and Dads, Grandparents, and siblings joined in the fun at the campfire too. I especially liked the campfire songs! The day and the venue were terrific.”

It was a pleasure to attending this wonderful day which aimed to give young people an opportunity to attend ‘summer’ camp for a day.  The event was held at Easter Seals Camp Woodeden, which allowed the campers to experience a true summer camp, as the ten campers were able to see the sleeping cabins, access the kitchen and craft area, and do many activities in the gym.

Wonderful games and activities were provided: from games to break the ice so the staff and young people could get to know each other a little better, a relay course, interactive games, and a basketball game.

Parker Tessier is 11 years old, and made the trip from Windsor, Ontario. Parker’s favourite activity of the day was the scavenger hunt! He also enjoyed the opportunity to make new friends. Parker was lucky enough to have visited this Easter Seals Camp during the summer, and the One Day Fun Day brought back all those amazing memories! Parker said, “I had a great time and hope that this happens again next year!”

As Cheryl mentioned, we also had the opportunity to bake some yummy cookies! This ThamesValley1was a perfect opportunity for everyone to experience moving around a kitchen and working together to bake something – the cookies were truly some of the best I have ever tasted!

The camp ran from 10am to 3pm, but parents, grandparents and siblings were invited back for 2pm to participate in the campfire activities.  This was a perfect opportunity for the young campers to show off the crafts they had made,  lead their families in a sing-along, and of course demonstrate their keen imaginations by offering a glimpse into their many varied talents which included: skits, story telling, and of course joke telling.  The camp fire was enjoyed by all, and everyone was quite impressed with the level of talent.  The cookies paired particularly well with our pizza lunch and other snacks – don’t worry though, amongst all the yumminess we did manage to serve some fruit as well.

I think the highlight of the day for me, truly, was the scavenger hunt.  The staff from TVCC dressed up and hid in various places of the camp.  When each group came upon them, they were given a rhyme, riddle or clue that allowed the campers as a team to solve it, and then move on to the next area, where hopefully – if you had solved the riddle or clue –  it landed you with the next person and another clue.  It was wonderful fun, and a great opportunity for everyone to work together, and share their many wonderful skills and talents.

It was a wonderful opportunity for Muscular Dystrophy Canada to partner with Thames Valley Children’s Centre, neuromuscular clinic and provide support.  As Rhonda, the Social Worker of the neuromuscular clinic says:

“I just wanted to sincerely thank you and Muscular Dystrophy Canada again for your support to our One Day Fun Day. The day went very well and not a bad turnout for the first time of doing it! Karen it was a blast having you join us for the activities – thanks for making the drive in the rain – it meant a lot.”

Because of the huge success of this “One Day Fun Day” the staff are planning to have their Neuromuscular Education Day for Families and Children with neuromuscular conditions at the same location this spring. So mark your calendars for May 3rd, 2014! For more information contact Cheryl.Scholtes@tvcc.on.ca.  Of course Muscular Dystrophy Canada will be a part of this wonderful day.

 ______________

Karen Dunbar is the Services Specialist for the Ontario and Nunavut for Muscular Dystrophy Canada. 

The Importance of Education and Advocacy for Respiratory Care

TWD 1In October 2010, Jeff Sparks and Tracy Ryan arranged a presentation on respiratory health with a respirologist in St.John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador. At the time, the presentation was a revelation to clients and staff at the Janeway, who had not heard a great deal about the importance of breathing aids, and respiratory health. Following on that initial presentation, communication was maintained with the Janeway clinic staff on the topic; one of the clinicians subsequently attended the workshop given for healthcare professionals by Dr. John Bach in Halifax in the fall of 2012.

Muscular Dystrophy Canada and March of Dimes held Health and Wellness Information Days for people living with a disability, on October 24 2013 in St. John`s. One of the key components was a workshop on respiratory care by Vital Air. The staff at Janeway not only took part in this initiative, but promoted this event as well. The day turned into a great forum for connecting persons with a disability, caregivers, and professionals on key issues. With lively discussions, and passion, it is evident that there is a need for more advocacy, and spaces to bring together people on disability issues whether it be respiratory care, or transportation.

All of these initiatives have led to ongoing communication and with the help of Janeway, has made a difference. The clinic coordinator, Jeanette Ivey, had long advocated for a respirologist, and a respiratory technician to be included as part of the clinical team. This past year, that has indeed happened, but the Janeway team has taken it a step further. When we visited the neuromuscular clinic in October 2013, we learned that they have organized patient visits so that those who are at the staff of needing respiratory support attend clinic on the same day. That change in approach ensures the patients can be followed more closely, and the respirologist will have more dedicated time with them. They have also integrated respiratory health more generally into all neuromuscular patients’ monitoring and care plans. Finally, they have been advocating with patients to gain them access to breathing aids such as cough assist machines.

While we can’t claim credit for all these changes, there is no doubt Muscular Dystrophy Canada has played a role in the Janeway Clinic’s integration of respiratory health into their clinical practice for people with neuromuscular diseases.

Living with a tracheostomy: Scott Parlee

Scott_ParleeLiving with a tracheostomy: Scott Parlee is 42 years old and lives in Fredericton, New Brunswick, with his mother and father. Scott, who has Duchenne muscular dystrophy, has had a tracheostomy and been using a ventilator for seven years. He has relied on mechanical ventilation ever since a severe respiratory infection landed him in the ICU for two months. Luckily, his family has been a strong advocate for Scott and his care. When there were questions about whether or not Scott would be able to move out of the ICU and live at home, Scott’s father, Allen, made a strong case that the costs of home ventilation should be covered by the provincial government. Not only would home be a happier environment for Scott, but it would actually cost the health-care system less than if Scott had to remain in the hospital.

In addition to the ventilator, Scott now uses a CoughAssist™ mechanical insufflator-exsufflator to help with his breathing and secretion release. His parents have noticed a tremendous difference in Scott’s respiratory health since he began this therapy, and they encourage others with respiratory muscle weakness to learn more about it. They believe that there is not enough awareness about the benefits of the CoughAssist™ device. In fact, Scott and his family have encountered many situations where health-care professionals did not know how to use the CoughAssist™ machine and had to be taught by Scott’s father. Scott and his parents advise others not to be fearful of getting a tracheostomy. They acknowledge that it has taken getting used to and that there is an adjustment period following the surgery and initiation of invasive ventilation.

For Scott, however, getting a tracheostomy was life saving, and it has not prevented him from leading a fulfilling and productive life. He travels extensively, and over the past few years, he has attended AC/DC, U2 and KISS concerts.

Read more in the Guide to Respiratory Care for Neuromuscular Disorders.