A Family Connection

md2[1]La version française suit.

For one Muscular Dystrophy Canada family, the connection to the organization goes back almost 60 years. Ken Killen was a career Fire Fighter with the Kingston Fire Department, and began volunteering with the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada in the late 1950s, a connection that carries on today through his daughter Debra Chiabai, and grandchildren Alex and Kate.

“My father was a career Fire Fighter in Kingston. He often had part time jobs in his off hours (bus driver, photographer, taxi driver) since in the early years it was not a particularly well paid job. Even though he was very busy with his full and part time work, he always made time to volunteer. The Fire Fighter charity of choice, then as now, was the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada,” remembers Debra. “I know he had a leadership role which I think would now be called Fire Fighter Advisor, but I’m not sure if that was just for his department or if it was more regional. He was responsible for a number of years for running the Kingston Telethon Centre and he also made frequent trips to the televised location in Watertown, New York to speak on behalf of Fire Fighters, co-host and to receive and deliver cheques. He would also take co-lead/coordinate the local canister drive and other events like McHappy Day. He also dressed up as a clown for fundraising events and to participate in the annual Kingston Santa Claus parade.”

md1[1]Debra would help out her dad with his volunteering duties when she could, “I loved to count the change from canisters. The mountain of change on the dining room table always looked huge and it was fun to see it slowly turn into rolls of coins. I became a really proficient roller of coins.”

“I also remember helping out with collecting coins at McHappy Day. I was quite young but I remember being struck by how drawn he was, in particular, to interacting with the children with muscular dystrophy. He was a natural both in knowing best how to help them while also giving them respect and a sense of dignity. I also remember answering the phones at the telethon at quite a young age and being very proud that MY Dad was on TV or running operations at the telethon centre.”

Her close interaction volunteering with her dad left a big impression, “I don’t really remember him specifically teaching me about muscular dystrophy or the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada, but I gained a lot of impressions and attitudes about volunteering, and respect for people with disabilities through watching him interact with both people with disabilities and his peers. I was always aware of his leadership role and his mentoring of younger firefighters to get them involved in the cause. He also was never afraid to ask people for donations or services to help the cause.”

.facebook_291828501Debra took what she learned from her father with her through her life, volunteering at Telethons, and getting involved with other charities and mentoring programs when she moved away from Kingston. When Debra and her husband Lawrence welcomed twins Alex and Kate in 2000, she did not know that the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada was going to once again play a role in their life.

In 2003, Debra’s son Alex was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Within two months of the diagnosis, Debra began volunteering with the Ottawa Chapter. “After Alex was diagnosed I knew two things: I needed information and I needed to do something to help the cause. Partially it was a way to network and get information, but I also knew I needed to get involved in finding a cure and in helping others.  It had to mean more than just what was happening to our family.”

As she became more involved in the Chapter, Debra realized that there were leadership opportunities within the organization. “I was very interested in the Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee so I started there, and then I was approached to be Ontario Chapter Advisor, and then National Chapter Advisor. I am not sure I would have put myself forward to be nominated to the Board because I did not feel particularly qualified, but now that I am on the Board I really enjoy being involved in the process of ensuring we do the best job everyday of delivering on our mission and vision. I also feel privileged to work with my fellow board members – a group of amazing and dedicated people.”

As the National Chapter Advisor, Debra chairs the Chapter Advisory Committee and reports back to the Board. She is also a member of the Executive Committee, representing volunteers and chapters, and a member of the Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee. “In all these roles, I attend meetings and conferences and provide support to volunteers and support the success of the organization in any way possible. I also attend international and national conferences as a volunteer representative of Muscular Dystrophy Canada. In the past two years I have been involved in meetings with the advocacy activities and conferences with the Canadian Organization for Rare Disorders, a national meeting for paediatric endocrinology, a national meeting for neuromuscular researchers, and the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy annual conference.”

What does Alex think of the family’s long-standing relationship with Muscular Dystrophy Canada?

IMG1830“I think Alex finds it comforting that it has been a part of our family for a very long time. My father died when Alex was a year old which was 1 ½ years before Alex was diagnosed. I often say that if my father was still alive he would be one of Alex’s champions and an avid volunteer for MDC. I think Alex finds comfort in knowing he has the organization behind him and supporting him. As a younger child he was eager to participate in awareness and media events. Now that he is older, he is a bit shyer about appearing publically.”

“Alex’s twin sister Kate has become a great fundraiser and volunteer for MDC because of her brother. She heads up our family and friends team each year for the Walk for Muscular Dystrophy and proudly displays our top team plaque on the wall of her room. She loves to volunteer and really sees what a difference it can make in the lives of those with neuromuscular disorders. I think she also likes volunteering like Grandpa did.”

_________________________________________________________________________

Une tradition familiale

md2[1]Pour une famille de Dystrophie musculaire Canada, le lien avec l’organisation remonte à près de 60 ans. Ken Killen, un pompier du Service d’incendie de Kingston, a commencé à être bénévole pour l’Association canadienne de la dystrophie musculaire vers la fin des années 1950, une tradition que perpétue encore aujourd’hui sa fille, Debra Chiabai, et ses petits-enfants, Alex et Kate.

« Mon père était pompier à Kingston. Il a souvent occupé des emplois à temps partiel dans ses heures libres (chauffeur d’autobus, photographe, chauffeur de taxi). Il faut se rappeler que dans ces années-là, être pompier n’était pas particulièrement bien payé. Même si ses emplois à temps plein et à temps partiel le tenaient très occupé, il trouvait toujours le temps de faire du bénévolat. L’organisme caritatif privilégié par les pompiers, à cette époque comme aujourd’hui, était l’Association canadienne de la dystrophie musculaire, relate Debra. Je sais qu’il occupait un poste de responsabilité, ce qui équivaut aujourd’hui au rôle de représentant des pompiers, mais je ne suis pas certaine s’il était représentant de son service d’incendie ou des pompiers de sa région. Pendant plusieurs années, il a été chargé du centre d’appels de Kingston pour le Téléthon Jerry Lewis et il se rendait souvent à Watertown, New York, d’où était télévisé le téléthon, pour parler au nom des pompiers, agir comme animateur et recevoir et remettre des chèques. Il codirigeait aussi la campagne des tirelires de Kingston et d’autres activités comme le Grand McDon. Enfin, il se déguisait en clown lors d’activités-bénéfice et pour participer au défilé annuel du Père Noël de Kingston. »

md1[1]Debra aidait son père dans ses activités bénévoles chaque fois qu’elle le pouvait. « J’aimais bien compter la monnaie dans les tirelires. La montagne de monnaie sur la table de la salle à manger avait toujours l’air énorme et c’était amusant de la voir se transformer lentement en rouleaux. Je suis devenue très efficace à rouler des sous. »

« Je me rappelle aussi d’avoir aidé mon père à ramasser des dons au Grand McDon. J’étais très jeune mais je me rappelle avoir été frappée de voir sa façon d’interagir avec les gens, mais surtout avec les enfants atteints de dystrophie musculaire. Il avait vraiment un don, tant pour savoir la meilleure façon de les aider que pour leur donner du respect et un sens de la dignité. Je me rappelle aussi avoir répondu au téléphone lors du téléthon alors que j’étais encore très jeune. J’étais très fière que MON père passe à la télé et dirige les opérations au centre d’appels du téléthon. »

Être associée de près aux activités bénévoles de son père a fortement impressionné Debra : « Je ne me rappelle pas vraiment que mon père ait voulu m’enseigner quoi que ce soit sur la dystrophie musculaire ou sur l’Association canadienne de la dystrophie musculaire, mais j’ai beaucoup appris sur le bénévolat et le respect des personnes handicapées en le voyant agir, tant avec les personnes atteintes qu’avec ses collègues. J’étais toujours consciente de son rôle de leader et de mentor auprès des pompiers plus jeunes pour les inciter à s’impliquer pour la cause. Il n’avait jamais peur non plus de solliciter des dons ou des services pour aider la cause. »

Debra a conservé les leçons apprises de son père toute sa vie, devenant bénévole pour les téléthons et s’impliquant auprès d’autres organismes caritatifs et programmes de mentorat après avoir quitté Kingston. Lorsqu’en 2000, Debra et son mari, Lawrence, eurent leurs jumeaux, Alex et Kate, elle ne se doutait pas que l’Association canadienne de la dystrophie musculaire allait à nouveau jouer un rôle dans sa vie.

.facebook_291828501En 2003, Alex recevait un diagnostic de dystrophie musculaire de Duchenne. Deux mois plus tard, Debra devenait bénévole à la section locale d’Ottawa. « Après le diagnostic d’Alex, je savais deux choses : j’avais besoin d’information et j’avais besoin de faire quelque chose pour aider la cause. En partie, c’était une façon pour moi de réseauter et d’avoir de l’information, mais je savais aussi que j’avais besoin de m’impliquer dans la lutte aux maladies neuromusculaires et d’aider d’autres personnes. Il fallait que ce qui arrivait à ma famille ait un sens plus large. »

À mesure qu’elle s’impliquait davantage dans les activités de la section locale, Debra réalisait qu’il y avait au sein de l’organisme de nombreuses fonctions de responsabilité pour des bénévoles. « J’étais très intéressée par le Comité consultatif scientifique et médical, alors c’est là que j’ai commencé. Et puis on m’a demandé de devenir représentante des sections locales de l’Ontario, puis représentante nationale. Je ne suis pas certaine que j’aurais moi-même osé proposer ma candidature au conseil, parce que je ne me sentais pas particulièrement qualifiée, mais à présent que je siège au conseil, j’aime beaucoup contribuer à réaliser chaque jour notre mission et notre vision. Je me considère aussi privilégiée de travailler avec mes collègues du conseil d’administration, un groupe de personnes extraordinairement engagées. »

À titre de représentante nationale des sections locales, Debra préside le Comité consultatif des relations avec les sections locales et fait rapport des activités de celui-ci au conseil. Elle fait aussi partie du comité exécutif où elle représente les bénévoles et les sections locales et est membre du Comité consultatif scientifique et médical. « Dans tous ces rôles, je participe à des rencontres et des conférences et soutient les bénévoles et le succès de l’organisation de toutes les façons possibles. Je participe aussi aux conférences internationales et nationales à titre de représentante bénévole de Dystrophie musculaire Canada. Au cours des deux dernières années, j’ai participé aux réunions et conférences sur la défense des droits et l’action sociale d’une organisation canadienne pour les maladies rares, à une rencontre nationale d’endocrinologie pédiatrique, à une rencontre de chercheurs du domaine des maladies neuromusculaires, et à la conférence annuelle du PPMD (Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy, États-Unis.) »

Que pense Alex de la relation de longue date de sa famille avec Dystrophie musculaire Canada?

IMG1830« Je crois qu’il est réconfortant pour Alex que cela fasse partie de notre famille depuis si longtemps. Mon père est décédé lorsqu’Alex avait un an, c’est-à-dire un an et demi avant qu’il ne reçoive son diagnostic. Je dis souvent que si mon père était encore vivant, il serait l’un des plus grands champions d’Alex et un bénévole chevronné de DMC. Je crois qu’il est aussi réconfortant pour Alex de savoir que l’organisation est derrière lui et qu’elle l’appuie. Plus jeune, il était toujours prêt à participer aux campagnes de sensibilisation et aux événements média. À présent qu’il est plus vieux, il est un peu plus gêné de se montrer en public. »

« Kate, la sœur jumelle d’Alex, est devenue une bénévole accomplie et recueille des fonds pour DMC. C’est elle qui dirige chaque année notre équipe de parents et d’amis pour la Dystromarche et c’est sur le mur de sa chambre qu’est affichée notre plaque de « Meilleure équipe ». Elle adore être bénévole et voir les changements concrets que son implication apporte à la vie des personnes qui ont une maladie neuromusculaire. Je crois qu’elle aime aussi savoir qu’elle suit dans les pas de son grand-père. »

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s